Advance in understanding actin sheds light on cell function

A tiny chemical modification on one of the most abundant and important proteins in cells, actin, has long been somewhat mysterious, its function not fully understood, but scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at ...

Scientists take totally tubular journey through brain cells

In a new study, scientists at the National Institutes of Health took a molecular-level journey into microtubules, the hollow cylinders inside brain cells that act as skeletons and internal highways. They watched how a protein ...

Using nanopores to detect epigenetic changes faster

Changes known as epigenetic modifications play an important role in cancer development. Being able to analyze them quickly and reliably could contribute significantly to the further development of personalized therapy. A ...

From yeast to hypha: How Candida albicans makes the switch

You might call Candida albicans a shape-shifter: As this fungus grows, it can multiply as single, oval-shaped cells called yeast or propagate in an elongated form called hypha, consisting of thread-like filaments.

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Acetylation

Acetylation (or in IUPAC nomenclature ethanoylation) describes a reaction that introduces an acetyl functional group into a chemical compound. (Deacetylation is the removal of the acetyl group.)

Specifically, acetylation refers to that process of introducing an acetyl group (resulting in an acetoxy group) into a compound, to be specific, the substitution of an acetyl group for an active hydrogen atom. A reaction involving the replacement of the hydrogen atom of a hydroxyl group with an acetyl group (CH3 CO) yields a specific ester, the acetate. Acetic anhydride is commonly used as an acetylating agent reacting with free hydroxyl groups. For example, it is used in the synthesis of aspirin and heroin.

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