Hydrogen-making algae's 'Achilles' heel' discovered

(PhysOrg.com) -- Scientists have discovered how oxygen stops green algae from producing hydrogen. The findings could help those working towards 'solar H2-farms' in which microorganisms produce hydrogen fuel from sunlight ...

Improving high-energy lithium-ion batteries with carbon filler

Lithium-ion batteries are the major rechargeable power source for many portable devices as well as electric vehicles, but their use is limited, because they do not provide high power output while simultaneously allowing reversible ...

Predicting X-ray absorption spectra from graphs

X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a popular characterization technique for probing the local atomic structure and electronic properties of materials and molecules. Because atoms of each element absorb X-rays at characteristic ...

Researchers find new shape for hydrophobic molecules in water

The embedding of hydrophobic molecules in water looks quite different than previously assumed. In water, hydrophobic molecules are surrounded by a two different water populations: the inner shell forms a two-dimensional network ...

Shocking heat waves stabilize single atoms

Single atoms work great as catalysts, but they usually don't stay single for long. Argonne scientists are part of a team that uses high-temperature shock waves to keep them in their place.

New approach facilitates spectroscopy on individual molecules

While spectroscopic measurements are normally averaged over myriad molecules, a new method developed by researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) provides precise information about the interaction of individual ...

Nanodiamonds as photocatalysts

Climate change is in full swing and will continue unabated as long as CO2 emissions continue. One possible solution is to return CO2 to the energy cycle: CO2 could be processed with water into methanol, a fuel that can be ...

Fix for synchrotron research flaw could improve results

University of Saskatchewan researchers have found that chemicals commonly used to protect samples in synchrotron experiments actually help to damage those samples, potentially misleading scientists around the world.

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