The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) began in 1895 in the New York City area. Today,WCS original flagship site, The Bronx Zoo has The New York Aquarium, Central Park Zoo, Queens Zoo, Prospect Park Zoo and conservation projects in 53 countries. WCS Institute was founded in 2005 as a think tank for conservation and scientific inquiry of species, their inter-relationships, global poverty and conservation and a myriad of world-wide concern for preservations of all the species. In cooperation with Fordham University, WCS and the Bronx Zoo offer a master's degree in education. The Manhattan Project exemplifies WCS commitment to local communities by renovating and rehabilitating historical areas like the Hudson Bay and Manhattan, New York. WCS has affiliates in numerous countries and Canada's WCS works in conjunction with the American WCS in areas contiguous to one another. WCS publishes statistics, news about each of its affiliate sites and all of its managed projects. Images are for sale, not for public distribution.

Address
2300 Southern Boulevard Bronx, New York 10460
Website
http://www.wcs.org
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wildlife_Conservation_Society

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Forest fragments surprising havens for wildlife

Destruction of tropical rainforests reduces many unprotected habitats to small fragments of remnant forests within agricultural lands, and to date, these remnant forest fragments have been largely disregarded as wildlife ...

Frogs find refuge in elephant tracks

Frogs need elephants. That's what a new WCS-led study says that looked at the role of water-filled elephant tracks in providing predator-free breeding grounds and pathways connecting frog populations.

Changes in subsistence hunting threaten local food security

Scientists with the Universidad San Francisco de Quito and WCS Ecuador Program publishing in the journal BioTropica say that subsistence hunting in Neotropical rain forests—the mainstay of local people as a source of protein ...

This hawk likes crab for dinner

Red-shouldered hawks (Buteo lineatus) feed primarily on mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and invertebrates, the majority of which are insects and crustaceans, with the latter represented to date only by crayfish.

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