The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute was formed in 1992 for the purposes of funding biomedical research. Specifically genome sequencing efforts. It is the largest charity in the U.K., and receives a majority of its funds from the Wellcome Trust. The Institute is responsible for the completion of the sequencing of approximately 1/3 of the human genome and model genomes of the mouse and zebrafish and more than 90 pathogen genomes. Today, the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has been able to attract top scientists and has more than 30 Senior Researchers on staff. The Institute is located in Hinxton, Cambridge, U.K., and spends approximately 650 British Pounds annually to support relevant research by preeminent scientists and labs around the globe. The Institute supports work at the University of Nottingham, MIT, University of Toronto, University of Gothenburg, University of Manchester and other institutions of higher learning research labs.

Address
Hinxton, Cambs, CB10 1SA, UK
Website
http://www.sanger.ac.uk/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wellcome_Trust_Sanger_Institute

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Subscribe to rss feed

Genome damage from CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing higher than thought

Scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute have discovered that CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing can cause greater genetic damage in cells than was previously thought. These results create safety implications for gene therapies ...

Whole-genome sequencing of endangered mountain gorillas

The first project to sequence whole genomes from mountain gorillas has given scientists and conservationists new insight into the impact of population decline on these critically endangered apes. While mountain gorillas are ...

The biggest expansion of man in prehistory?

DNA sequencing of 36 complete Y chromosomes has uncovered a previously unknown period when the human population expanded rapidly. This population explosion occurred 40 to 50 thousand years ago, between the first expansion ...

Gorilla genome sequenced

The assembly of the gorilla genome was announced today, March 7, by a multi-national group of researchers. The gorilla is the last genus of the living great apes to have its genome decoded. While confirming that our closest ...

page 1 from 7