The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research is Australia's oldest medical research institute. In 2011, the institute is home to more than 650 researchers who are working to understand, prevent and treat diseases including blood, breast and ovarian cancers; inflammatory diseases (autoimmunity) such as rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease; and infectious diseases such as malaria, HIV and hepatitis B and C. Located in Parkville, Melbourne, it is closely associated with The University of Melbourne and The Royal Melbourne Hospital. The institute also has a campus at La Trobe University. The institute was founded in 1915 using funds from a trust established by Eliza Hall following the death of her husband Walter Russell Hall. The institute owes its origin to the inspiration of Harry Brookes Allen, who encouraged the use of a small portion of the charitable trust to found a medical research institute. The vision was for an institute that 'will be the birthplace of discoveries rendering signal service to mankind in the prevention and removal of disease and the mitigation of suffering.’

Address
Victoria, Australia
Website
http://www.wehi.edu.au/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_and_Eliza_Hall_Institute_of_Medical_Research

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How sleeping mammary stem cells are awakened in puberty

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have discovered how the growth of milk-producing mammary glands is triggered during puberty.Sleeping stem cells in the mammary gland are awoken by a protein dubbed FoxP1, according ...

Hijacker parasite blocked from infiltrating blood

A major international collaboration led by Melbourne researchers has discovered that the world's most widespread malaria parasite infects humans by hijacking a protein the body cannot live without. The researchers were then ...

Carbohydrates may be the key to a better malaria vaccine

An international research team has shown for the first time that carbohydrates on the surface of malaria parasites play a critical role in malaria's ability to infect mosquito and human hosts.

Malaria parasites 'walk through walls' to infect humans

Researchers have identified proteins that enable deadly malaria parasites to 'walk through cell walls' - a superpower that was revealed using the Institute's first insectary to grow human malaria parasites.

Atomic map gives malaria drug new lease on life

Researchers have for the first time mapped how one of the longest-serving malaria drugs works, opening the possibility of altering its structure to make it more effective and combat increasing malaria drug resistance.

Animation library to increase science literacy in Victoria

Addressing a strong demand within the STEM community for meaningful and accessible education tools—especially around complex topics, the project will offer valuable teaching and learning resources to schools and universities ...

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