The Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) is one of the oldest and largest schools of oceanography focused on coastal ocean and estuarine science in the United States. Founded in 1938, VIMS operates three campuses, has 57 faculty members and a total student body ranging from 100 - 125 students, and is a part of the College of William & Mary. It is funded by the Commonwealth of Virginia and includes four academic departments: Biological Sciences, Environmental and Aquatic Animal Health, Fisheries Science, and Physical Sciences, and offers both M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in marine science. The main campus is located in Gloucester Point, Virginia.

Website
http://www.vims.edu/

Subscribe to rss feed

Study highlights vulnerability of rural coast to sea-level rise

Type "sea-level rise" in an internet search engine and almost all the resulting images will show flooded cities, with ample guidance on civic options for protecting urban infrastructure, from constructing seawalls to elevating ...

Study identifies bottlenecks in early seagrass growth

Seagrass meadows, key nursery and feeding grounds for many kinds of marine life, are being lost worldwide to nutrient pollution, warming waters, and other ills. A new study by an international research team reveals bottlenecks ...

Study predicts salt marshes will persist despite rising seas

A new study in Nature Climate Change contends that traditional assessment methods overestimate the vulnerability of salt marshes to sea-level rise because they don't fully account for processes that allow the marshes to grow ...

Biodiversity promotes multitasking in ecosystems

A new study of the complex interplay between organisms and their environment shows that biodiversity—the variety of organisms living on Earth—is even more important to the healthy functioning of ecosystems than previously ...

Study reveals strong links between Antarctic climate, food web

A long-term study of the links between climate and marine life along the rapidly warming West Antarctic Peninsula reveals how changes in physical factors such as wind speed and sea-ice cover send ripples up the food chain, ...

Model now capable of street-level storm-tide predictions

The water that surged into the intersection of New York City's Canal and Hudson streets during Hurricane Sandy—to choose just one flood-ravaged locale—was ultimately driven ashore by forces swirling hundreds of miles ...

Global study reveals new hotspots of fish biodiversity

Teeming with millions of species, tropical coral reefs have been long thought to be the areas of greatest biodiversity for fishes and other marine life—and thus most deserving of resources for conservation.

page 1 from 5