The Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) is one of the oldest and largest schools of oceanography focused on coastal ocean and estuarine science in the United States. Founded in 1938, VIMS operates three campuses, has 57 faculty members and a total student body ranging from 100 - 125 students, and is a part of the College of William & Mary. It is funded by the Commonwealth of Virginia and includes four academic departments: Biological Sciences, Environmental and Aquatic Animal Health, Fisheries Science, and Physical Sciences, and offers both M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in marine science. The main campus is located in Gloucester Point, Virginia.

Website
http://www.vims.edu/

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Seagrass restoration speeds recovery of ecosystem services

The reintroduction of seagrass into Virginia's coastal bays is one of the great success stories in marine restoration. Over the past two decades, scientists and volunteers have broadcast more than 70 million eelgrass seeds ...

Study shows wetter climate is likely to intensify global warming

A study in the May 6th issue of Nature indicates the increase in rainfall forecast by global climate models is likely to hasten the release of carbon dioxide from tropical soils, further intensifying global warming by adding ...

New cause found for intensification of oyster disease

A new paper in Scientific Reports led by researchers at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science challenges increased salinity and seawater temperatures as the established explanation for a decades-long increase ...

Warming may promote spread of invasive blue catfish

A study by researchers at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science suggests that continued warming of Atlantic coastal waters may enhance the spread of invasive blue catfish within the Chesapeake Bay and other ...

New study reveals biodiversity important at regional scales

New research shows that biodiversity is important not just at the traditional scale of short-term plot experiments—in which ecologists monitor the health of a single meadow, forest grove, or pond after manipulating its ...

Research reveals unique reproductive trait for seagrass

Seagrasses have long been known as some of Earth's most remarkable organisms—descendants of flowering land plants that have re-colonized the ocean by developing traits that allow them to grow, pollinate, and release seeded ...

Study highlights vulnerability of rural coast to sea-level rise

Type "sea-level rise" in an internet search engine and almost all the resulting images will show flooded cities, with ample guidance on civic options for protecting urban infrastructure, from constructing seawalls to elevating ...

Study identifies bottlenecks in early seagrass growth

Seagrass meadows, key nursery and feeding grounds for many kinds of marine life, are being lost worldwide to nutrient pollution, warming waters, and other ills. A new study by an international research team reveals bottlenecks ...

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