The Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) is one of the oldest and largest schools of oceanography focused on coastal ocean and estuarine science in the United States. Founded in 1938, VIMS operates three campuses, has 57 faculty members and a total student body ranging from 100 - 125 students, and is a part of the College of William & Mary. It is funded by the Commonwealth of Virginia and includes four academic departments: Biological Sciences, Environmental and Aquatic Animal Health, Fisheries Science, and Physical Sciences, and offers both M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in marine science. The main campus is located in Gloucester Point, Virginia.

Website
http://www.vims.edu/

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Study shows continuing impacts of Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Nine years ago tomorrow—April 20, 2010—crude oil began leaking from the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig into the Gulf of Mexico in what turned out to be the largest marine oil spill in history. A long-term study suggests ...

Study shows wetter climate is likely to intensify global warming

A study in the May 6th issue of Nature indicates the increase in rainfall forecast by global climate models is likely to hasten the release of carbon dioxide from tropical soils, further intensifying global warming by adding ...

Sesearchers unravel life cycle of blue-crab parasite

Professor Jeff Shields and colleagues at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science have succeeded in their 15-year effort to unravel the life history of Hematodinium, a single-celled parasite that afflicts blue crabs and is ...

Biodiversity promotes multitasking in ecosystems

A new study of the complex interplay between organisms and their environment shows that biodiversity—the variety of organisms living on Earth—is even more important to the healthy functioning of ecosystems than previously ...

Research reveals unique reproductive trait for seagrass

Seagrasses have long been known as some of Earth's most remarkable organisms—descendants of flowering land plants that have re-colonized the ocean by developing traits that allow them to grow, pollinate, and release seeded ...

New cause found for intensification of oyster disease

A new paper in Scientific Reports led by researchers at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science challenges increased salinity and seawater temperatures as the established explanation for a decades-long increase ...

VIMS reports intense and widespread algal blooms

Water sampling and aerial photography by researchers at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science show that the algal blooms currently coloring lower Chesapeake Bay are among the most intense and widespread of ...

Team develops underwater robot to assist in oil-spill cleanup

One big challenge facing cleanup crews during an offshore oil spill—such as 2010's Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico—is determining just how much oil is involved. Researchers at the Virginia Institute of ...

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