Molecular biologists travel back in time 3 billion years

A research group working at Uppsala University has succeeded in studying 'translation factors' – important components of a cell's protein synthesis machinery—that are several billion years old. By studying these ancient ...

Genome sequencing reveals a new species of bumblebee

While studying genetic diversity in bumblebees in the Rocky Mountains, U.S., researchers from Uppsala University discovered a new species. They named it Bombus incognitus and present their findings in the journal Molecular ...

Largest-ever DNA mapping study of the Philippines

Over 50 millennia, at least five major immigration waves have successively populated the Philippines, the most comprehensive survey of genetic variations in the country to date shows. This Uppsala University study, published ...

New model can predict how bacteria develop antibiotic resistance

Using theoretical models of bacterial metabolism and reproduction, scientists can predict the type of resistance that bacteria will develop when they are exposed to antibiotics. This has now been shown by an Uppsala University ...

New light shed on the early evolution of limb bone marrow

When and how bone marrow first originated in the limbs of early four-legged animals is disputed in evolutionary biology. With the help of powerful X-ray technology, an international research team, led by Uppsala University, ...

Producing more sustainable hydrogen with composite polymer dots

Hydrogen for energy use can be extracted in an environmentally friendly way from water and sunlight, using photocatalytic composite polymer nanoparticles developed by researchers at Uppsala University. In laboratory tests, ...

Warmer climate may make new mutations more harmful

A warmer global climate can cause mutations to have more severe consequences for the health of organisms through their detrimental effect on protein function. This may have major repercussions on organisms' ability to adapt ...

Ions in molten salts can 'go against the flow'

In a new article published in the scientific journal Communications Chemistry, a research group at Uppsala University show, using computer simulations, that ions do not always behave as expected. In their research on molten ...

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