The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center is one of the original 3 cancer treatment centers established after the 1971 National Cancer Act. It is a degree awarding institution and is connected to the University of Texas Medical Centers in Houston. Today the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center is one of the finest cancer treatment and research hospitals rivaled only by the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. There are approximately 36 other cancer treatment centers designated by the National Cancer Institute as cancer centers. It is a 512 bed hospital with a Level 1 Trauma Center that employs over 17,000 professionals and support staff. The M.D. Anderson Cancer Center offers fellowships, internships and residency opportunities. The Center can trace its inception to 1941 by virtue of an act of the Texas Legislature.

Address
1515 Holcombe Blvd Unit 229, Houston, TX 77030
Website
http://www.mdanderson.org/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_University_of_Texas_M._D._Anderson_Cancer_Center

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Hippo 'crosstalk' may be vital to tumor suppression

Think of a waterfall, and you might see why cell-signaling pathways are important to cancer research. As water cascades, it impacts everything downstream. And everything upstream affects the waterfall.

YEATS protein potential therapeutic target for cancer

Federal Express and UPS are no match for the human body when it comes to distribution. There exists in cancer biology an impressive packaging and delivery system that influences whether your body will develop cancer or not.

Scientists discover secret life of chromatin

Chromatin - the intertwined histone proteins and DNA that make up chromosomes – constantly receives messages that pour in from a cell’s intricate signaling networks: Turn that gene on. Stifle that one.

Protein identified as enemy of vital tumor suppressor PTEN

A protein known as WWP2 appears to play a key role in tumor survival, a research team headed by a scientist at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in an advance online publication of Nature Cell Biology.

Protein and microRNA block cellular transition vital to metastasis

Like a bounty hunter returning escapees to custody, a cancer-fighting gene converts organ cells that change into highly mobile stem cells back to their original, stationary state, researchers report online at Nature Cell ...

Protein wields phosphate group to inhibit cancer metastasis

By sticking a chemical group to it at a specific site, a protein arrests an enzyme that may worsen and spread cancer, an international research team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports ...

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