Tiny motors take a big step forward

Motors are everywhere in our day-to-day lives—from cars to washing machines. A futuristic scientific field is working on tiny motors that could power a network of nanomachines and replace some of the power sources we use ...

Scientists hijack bacteria to ease drug manufacturing

For more affordable, sustainable drug options than we have today, the medication we take to treat high blood pressure, pain or memory loss may one day come from engineered bacteria, cultured in a vat like yogurt. And thanks ...

Virus discovery offers clues about origins of complex life

The first discovery of viruses infecting a group of microbes that may include the ancestors of all complex life has been found, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin report in Nature Microbiology. The discovery ...

Blood pressure e-tattoo promises continuous, mobile monitoring

Blood pressure is one of the most important indicators of heart health, but it's tough to frequently and reliably measure outside of a clinical setting. For decades, cuff-based devices that constrict around the arm to give ...

Climate change is coming for your ketchup

Climate change is on track to interfere with tomato production—and could be especially bad news for fans of ketchup, pizza sauce and other processed tomato products.

Sanctuary practices lower counties' crime rates, study finds

Counties that don't cooperate with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)—also known as "sanctuary counties"—have seen their crime rates decrease after implementing sanctuary policies, according to a new study from ...

For a smooth-running economy, rule of law matters

Countries in which courts more easily enforce contracts see less economic volatility overall than nations that don't adhere as well to the rule of law. That's the finding from a study by a finance researcher at The University ...

How electric fish were able to evolve electric organs

Electric organs help electric fish, such as the electric eel, do all sorts of amazing things: They send and receive signals that are akin to bird songs, helping them to recognize other electric fish by species, sex and even ...

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