The University of Melbourne was established in 1853 in Parkville, Victoria, Australia. Today the University of Melbourne has over 36,600 undergraduate, graduate and professional students. The university's Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, Melbourne School of Engineering, Faculty of Science and Biotechnology are regarded highly among world-wide universities. The University of Melbourne is ranked in the very top 100 of world-wide universities for its academic programs and is noted for its numerous Rhodes Scholars and a recent Nobel Prize recipient.

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Spinning diamonds for quantum precision

We live in a noisy world. Interference from light, vibrations, electromagnetic radiation and sound can be annoying; it messes with our sleep and can interfere with our electrical equipment.

Weighing and imaging molecules one at a time

Building on their creation of the first-ever mechanical device that can measure the mass of individual molecules, one at a time, a team of Caltech scientists and their colleagues have created nanodevices that can also reveal ...

'Atomic chicken-wire' is key to faster DNA sequencing

An unusual and very exciting form of carbon - that can be created by drawing on paper- looks to hold the key to real-time, high throughput DNA sequencing, a technique that would revolutionise medical research and testing.

No more bubbles when boiling water

(Phys.org)—The research, which is the first of its kind, has identified a specially engineered steel surface that allows liquids to boil without bubbling.

Single electron reader opens path for quantum computing

Researchers from University of New South Wales (Australia), University of Melbourne (Australia), and Aalto University (Finland) have succeeded in demonstrating a high-fidelity detection scheme for the magnetic state of a ...

The 'freak wave' myth

As a nation "girt by sea," Australians live with the joy and risks of the ocean.

The superheroes of nutrient detection living in our oceans

By and large, marine bacteria have a fairly simple existence – eat, divide, repeat. But the first step isn't always straightforward. There are lots of nutrients in the ocean, but there's no Uber Eats for microscopic organisms. ...

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