The University of Jyväskylä (Finnish: Jyväskylän yliopisto) is a research university in Jyväskylä, Finland. It has its origins in the first Finnish-speaking Teacher Training College (the so-called Teacher Seminary), founded in 1863. Around 15,000 students are currently enrolled in the degree programs of the university.[3] It is ranked as the second largest university in Finland when measured according to the number of master's degrees conferred.

Website
https://www.jyu.fi/en
Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Jyv%C3%A4skyl%C3%A4

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Nearly everyone responds to music with movement, whether through subtle toe-tapping or an all-out boogie. A recent discovery shows that our dance style is almost always the same, regardless of the type of music, and a computer ...

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