University of Innsbruck (German: Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck) has been a university in Austria since 1669. It is currently the largest education facility in the Austrian Bundesland of Tirol, the third largest in Austria behind Vienna University and the University of Graz and according to latest ratings Austria's leading university. Significant contributions have been made in many branches, most of all in the physics department. In 1562, a Jesuit grammar school was established in Innsbruck, today the "Akademisches Gymnasium Innsbruck". It was financed by the salt mines in Hall in Tirol and was founded as a university in 1669 by Leopold I with four faculties. In 1782 this was reduced to a mere lyceum (as were all other Universities in Austrian Empire, apart from Prague, Vienna and Lviv), but it was re-established as the University of Innsbruck in 1826 by Emperor Franz I. The university is therefore named after both of its founding fathers with the official title of: "Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck" (Universitas Leopoldino-Franciscea).

Address
Innrain 52, Innsbruck, Austria, Austria
Website
http://www.uibk.ac.at/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Innsbruck

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Lanthanoids offer great potential

A quarter of a century after the first creation of Bose-Einstein condensates, the journal Nature Physics publishes a focus issue on developments in the field of ultracold quantum gasses and their potential in the future. ...

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Quantum particles: Pulled and compressed

Very recently, researchers led by Markus Aspelmeyer at the University of Vienna and Lukas Novotny at ETH Zurich cooled a glass nanoparticle into the quantum regime for the first time. To do this, the particle is deprived ...

Quantum simulation: Measurement of entanglement made easier

University of Innsbruck researchers have developed a method to make previously hardly accessible properties in quantum systems measurable. The new method for determining the quantum state in quantum simulators reduces the ...

Compact quantum computer for server centers

Quantum computers developed to date have been one-of-a-kind devices that fill entire laboratories. Now, physicists at the University of Innsbruck have built a prototype of an ion trap quantum computer that can be used in ...

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