University of Innsbruck (German: Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck) has been a university in Austria since 1669. It is currently the largest education facility in the Austrian Bundesland of Tirol, the third largest in Austria behind Vienna University and the University of Graz and according to latest ratings Austria's leading university. Significant contributions have been made in many branches, most of all in the physics department. In 1562, a Jesuit grammar school was established in Innsbruck, today the "Akademisches Gymnasium Innsbruck". It was financed by the salt mines in Hall in Tirol and was founded as a university in 1669 by Leopold I with four faculties. In 1782 this was reduced to a mere lyceum (as were all other Universities in Austrian Empire, apart from Prague, Vienna and Lviv), but it was re-established as the University of Innsbruck in 1826 by Emperor Franz I. The university is therefore named after both of its founding fathers with the official title of: "Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck" (Universitas Leopoldino-Franciscea).

Address
Innrain 52, Innsbruck, Austria, Austria
Website
http://www.uibk.ac.at/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Innsbruck

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