University of Innsbruck

University of Innsbruck (German: Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck) has been a university in Austria since 1669. It is currently the largest education facility in the Austrian Bundesland of Tirol, the third largest in Austria behind Vienna University and the University of Graz and according to latest ratings Austria's leading university. Significant contributions have been made in many branches, most of all in the physics department. In 1562, a Jesuit grammar school was established in Innsbruck, today the "Akademisches Gymnasium Innsbruck". It was financed by the salt mines in Hall in Tirol and was founded as a university in 1669 by Leopold I with four faculties. In 1782 this was reduced to a mere lyceum (as were all other Universities in Austrian Empire, apart from Prague, Vienna and Lviv), but it was re-established as the University of Innsbruck in 1826 by Emperor Franz I. The university is therefore named after both of its founding fathers with the official title of: "Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck" (Universitas Leopoldino-Franciscea).

Address
Innrain 52, Innsbruck, Austria, Austria
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Quantum physicists achieve entanglement record

Entanglement is of central importance for the new quantum technologies of the 21st century. A German-Austrian research team is now presenting the largest entangled quantum register of individually controllable systems to ...

dateApr 16, 2018 in Quantum Physics
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Giant earthquakes: not as random as thought

By analyzing sediment cores from Chilean lakes, an international team of scientists discovered that giant earthquakes reoccur with relatively regular intervals. When also taking into account smaller earthquakes, the repeat ...

dateJan 30, 2018 in Earth Sciences
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Artificial agent designs quantum experiments

On the way to an intelligent laboratory, physicists from Innsbruck and Vienna present an artificial agent that autonomously designs quantum experiments. In initial experiments, the system has independently (re)discovered ...

dateJan 19, 2018 in Quantum Physics
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Quantum systems correct themselves

Quantum devices allow us to accomplish computing and sensing tasks that go beyond the capabilities of their classical counterparts. However, protecting quantum information from being corrupted by errors is difficult.

dateNov 28, 2017 in Quantum Physics
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Nanomagnets levitate thanks to quantum physics

Quantum physicists in Oriol Romero-Isart's research group in Innsbruck show in two current publications that, despite Earnshaw's theorem, nanomagnets can be stably levitated in an external static magnetic field owing to quantum ...

dateOct 27, 2017 in Quantum Physics
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New tool for characterizing quantum simulators

Physicsts are developing quantum simulators, to help solve problems that are beyond the reach of conventional computers. However, they first need new tools to ensure that the simulators work properly. Innsbruck researchers ...

dateSep 06, 2017 in Quantum Physics
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Physicists design ultrafocused pulses

Physicists working with researcher Oriol Romero-Isart devised a new simple scheme to theoretically generate arbitrarily short and focused electromagnetic fields. This new tool could be used for precise sensing and in microscopy.

dateJul 27, 2017 in Optics & Photonics
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