University of Guam

University of Guam (or Unibetsedåt Guåhan in Chamorro and commonly abbreviated as U.O.G.) is a four-year land-grant institution, located in the village of Mangilao on the island of Guam in the Western Pacific Ocean. It is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges and offers thirty-four degree programs at the undergraduate level and eleven master's level programs. Of the University's 3,387 students, 91% are of Asian-Pacific Islander ethnicity, and nearly 69% are full time (fall 2008 figures). A full-time faculty of about 180 supports the University's mission of "Ina, Diskubre, Setbe"— which translates to "To Enlighten, to Discover, to Serve." University Of Guam was founded in 1952 as a two year teacher-training school known as the Territorial College of Guam, established by Governor Carlton Skinner. In 1960, the college moved to the present campus in the central district of Mangilao. In 1965, the college was accredited as a four-year, degree granting institution. By 1968, enrollment had reached 1,800 students while staff and faculty totaled more than 130. It was designated as a land grant institution by the United States Congress in 1972.

Address
UOG Station, Mangilao, Guam, United States of America 96923
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Root behavior changes as woody trees age

The study of plant root behavior has always taken a back seat to the study of above-ground plant parts. But this hidden plant organ is just as important as stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits. Recent research from the University ...

dateAug 24, 2017 in Biotechnology
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Cycad leaf physiology research needed

The living cycad species are among the world's most threatened plant groups, but are also among the world's least studied plant groups. The need for a greater understanding of basic physiology of cycads has been discussed ...

dateAug 01, 2017 in Ecology
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Cycad seed tissue loaded with carbohydrates

Learning how to make a seed was one of the crucial transitions for the world's plants. The competitive advantages that seed-producing plants possess has led to their dominance in most contemporary natural habitats. Additionally, ...

dateNov 30, 2016 in Ecology
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