'Lab in your phone' lets you play the scientific life

The scientist inside your phone is having a stressful day. Trying to finish a research paper while keeping a batch of cells alive, the last thing they need is "something funky" in their petri dish.

Watching magnetic nano 'tornadoes' in 3-D

Scientists have developed a three-dimensional imaging technique to observe complex behaviours in magnets, including fast-moving waves and 'tornadoes' thousands of times thinner than a human hair.

Watching TV helps birds make better food choices

By watching videos of each other eating, blue tits and great tits can learn to avoid foods that taste disgusting and are potentially toxic, a new study has found. Seeing the 'disgust response' in others helps them recognise ...

Random gene pulsing generates patterns of life

A team of Cambridge scientists working on the intersection between biology and computation has found that random gene activity helps patterns form during development of a model multicellular system.

Producing single photons from a stream of single electrons

Researchers at the University of Cambridge have developed a novel technique for generating single photons, by moving single electrons in a specially designed light-emitting diode (LED). This technique, reported in the journal ...

New book shows how to build a more flood resilient future

Seven of the United Kingdom's ten wettest years on record have occurred since 1998. Its wettest winter in history came in 2013, and the next wettest in 2015. In a single week in November 2019, 400 homes were flooded and 1,200 ...

Sand dunes can 'communicate' with each other

Even though they are inanimate objects, sand dunes can 'communicate' with each other. A team from the University of Cambridge has found that as they move, sand dunes interact with and repel their downstream neighbours.

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