Deadly fungus uses unexpected system to control its virulence

A research team led by UC San Francisco scientists has discovered a cellular signaling system that regulates the virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans, a fungus that has been estimated to cause nearly a million cases of meningitis ...

Hybrid cancer drug could be resistance-resistant

A team of cancer researchers led by scientists at UC San Francisco and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center demonstrated in human cells and mouse models that a first-of-its-kind hybrid drug can outsmart drug-resistant cancers.

Math points to 100-times faster mapping of gene activity

New research by UCSF scientists could accelerate – by 10 to 100-fold – the pace of many efforts to profile gene activity, ranging from basic research into how to build new tissues from stem cells to clinical efforts to ...

Genetic traffic signal orchestrates early embryonic development

You are the product of metamorphosis. During the third week of your embryonic existence, fateful genetic choices were made that began to transform a tiny ball of identical stem cells into a complex organism of flesh and blood, ...

When poverty becomes disease

Talmadge King Jr., MD, dean of the UCSF School of Medicine, tells the story of an ER physician who had lost a document and was searching frantically for it in the garbage bins behind Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital ...

Researchers create cellular 'ORACLs' to aid drug discovery

A team of researchers at UC San Francisco has devised a new approach for early stage drug discovery that uses techniques from the world of computer vision in combination with a powerful new tool: a lineage of genetically ...

Sensory illusion causes cells to self-destruct

Magic tricks work because they take advantage of the brain's sensory assumptions, tricking audiences into seeing phantoms or overlooking sleights of hand. Now a team of UC San Francisco researchers has discovered that even ...

Human gene prevents regeneration in zebrafish

Regenerative medicine could one day allow physicians to correct congenital deformities, regrow damaged fingers, or even mend a broken heart. But to do it, they will have to reckon with the body's own anti-cancer security ...

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