The University of Bergen (Norwegian: Universitetet i Bergen) is located in Bergen, Norway. Although founded as late as 1946, academic activity had taken place at Bergen Museum as far back as 1825. The university today serves more than 14,500 students. It is one of eight universities in Norway, the other seven being the University of Oslo, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, the University of Tromsø, the University of Stavanger, the University of Agder, the Norwegian University of Life Sciences in Ås and the University of Nordland in Bodø. Home students (European citizens) do not pay fees to the university. Students are however required to be members of the student welfare organisation. As of Fall 2009, this fee (semesteravgift) is NOK 470 (approx. US$ 80) per semester, and provides access to several services, including cultural activities, childcare, refunds for many medical expenses and subsidized accommodation.

Address
Professor Keysers gt. 8, Bergen, Norway, Norway
Website
http://www.uib.no/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Bergen

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Humans evolved by sharing technology and culture

Blombos Cave in South Africa has given us vast knowledge about our early ancestors. In 2015, four open access articles, with research finds from Blombos as a starting point, have been published in the journal PLOS ONE.

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