The University of Bergen (Norwegian: Universitetet i Bergen) is located in Bergen, Norway. Although founded as late as 1946, academic activity had taken place at Bergen Museum as far back as 1825. The university today serves more than 14,500 students. It is one of eight universities in Norway, the other seven being the University of Oslo, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, the University of Tromsø, the University of Stavanger, the University of Agder, the Norwegian University of Life Sciences in Ås and the University of Nordland in Bodø. Home students (European citizens) do not pay fees to the university. Students are however required to be members of the student welfare organisation. As of Fall 2009, this fee (semesteravgift) is NOK 470 (approx. US$ 80) per semester, and provides access to several services, including cultural activities, childcare, refunds for many medical expenses and subsidized accommodation.

Address
Professor Keysers gt. 8, Bergen, Norway, Norway
Website
http://www.uib.no/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Bergen

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Endless forms most beautiful: Why evolution favours symmetry

From sunflowers to starfish, symmetry appears everywhere in biology. This isn't just true for body plans—the molecular machines keeping our cells alive are also strikingly symmetric. But why? Does evolution have a built-in ...

The Gulf Stream has increased steadily over the last century

Together with colleagues, Lars H. Smedsrud, professor at UiB and researcher at the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, have examined 100 years of research results to see how the ocean transport has evolved.

Prehistoric megafloods smaller than assumed

Mighty floods have carved out deep canyons on Earth. New research suggests this may have required less power than previously thought. Collecting such data, however, may be demanding.

No quick fix for climate change

We could spray the atmosphere with particles that reflect sunlight or fertilize algae to grow and take up more CO2. We could release minerals that react with CO2or capture the gas directly from the air. These are some of ...

Demise of a glacier, uncovering a fjord

The Hardanger region in southwestern Norway is famous for a mild climate, steep rock walls and delicious apples. Towards the end of the last Ice Age, things were different. Climate was frigid, too cold for humans to settle, ...

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