Columbia University

Learning from slow-slip earthquakes

Off the coast of New Zealand, there is an area where earthquakes can happen in slow-motion as two tectonic plates grind past one another. The Pacific plate is moving under New Zealand at about 5 centimeters per year there, ...

dateDec 15, 2016 in Earth Sciences
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'Highway from hell' fueled Costa Rican volcano

If some volcanoes operate on geologic timescales, Costa Rica's Irazú had something of a short fuse. In a new study in the journal Nature, scientists suggest that the 1960s eruption of Costa Rica's largest stratovolcano was ...

dateJul 31, 2013 in Earth Sciences
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Seeking humanity's roots

Who were our earliest ancestors? How and when did they evolve into modern humans? And how do we define "human," anyway? Was it when some long-ago ancestor stood and walked; grew a brain of a certain size; or figured out how ...

dateJun 09, 2016 in Archaeology & Fossils
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What geology has to say about global warming

Last month I gave a public lecture entitled, "When Maine was California," to an audience in a small town in Maine. It drew parallels between California, today, and Maine, 400 million years ago, when similar geologic processes ...

dateJul 14, 2014 in Earth Sciences
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Southwest headed for permanent drought

(PhysOrg.com) -- The American Southwest has seen naturally induced dry spells throughout the past, but now human-induced global warming could push the region into a permanent drought in the coming decades, according to Lamont-Doherty ...

dateJan 31, 2011 in Earth Sciences
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