The Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) is a research institution in India dedicated to basic research in mathematics and the sciences. It is a Deemed University and works under the umbrella of the Department of Atomic Energy of the Government of India. It is located at Navy Nagar, Colaba, Mumbai. TIFR conducts research primarily in natural sciences, mathematics, biological sciences and theoretical computer science and is considered one of the outstanding research centres in India. TIFR has a graduate program leading to a PhD in all the major fields of study. In 1944, Homi J. Bhabha, known for his role in the development of the Indian atomic energy program, wrote to Sir Dorabji Tata Trust requesting financial assistance to set up a scientific research institute. With support from J. R. D. Tata, then chairman of the Tata Group, TIFR was founded on 1 June 1945, and Homi Bhabha was appointed its first director. The institute started function within the campus of the Indian Institute of Science, Banglore, and moved to Mumbai (then Bombay) later that year.

Address
Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India 400 005
Website
http://www.tifr.res.in/index.php/en/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tata_Institute_of_Fundamental_Research

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Watching the ultrafast dance moves of a laser plasma

Great leaps in science and technology have been propelled by recent advances in seeing fast evolving physical phenomena, as they happen. Femtosecond lasers from the infrared to the X-ray region have enabled us to 'watch', ...

The patchy environment of a rare cosmic explosion revealed

Scientists from the National Centre for radio Astrophysics of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (NCRA-TIFR) Pune used the upgraded Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (uGMRT) to determine that AT 2018 cow, the first ...

Cosmic X-rays reveal a distinct signature of black holes

An international team of astrophysicists has found distinctive signatures of black hole event horizons, unmistakably separating them from neutron stars, which are objects comparable to black holes in mass and size but confined ...

A magnetic field with an edge

A team of Indian and Japanese physicists have overturned the six-decade old notion that the giant magnetic field in a high intensity laser produced plasma evolves from the small, nanometre scale in the bulk plasma. They show ...

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