The Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology is organized to integrate the many fields of specialization which occur in the broad field of biology. The society is dedicated to promoting the pursuit and dissemination of important information relating to biology. The society was formed in 1902 through the merger of two societies, the "Central Naturalists" and the "American Morphological Society" to form the American Society of Zoologists. In 1996 the name was changed to the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. The society publishes two scientific journals: the bimonthly journal Integrative and Comparative Biology (formerly the American Zoologist) and Evolution & Development.

Website
http://www.sicb.org/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_for_Integrative_and_Comparative_Biology

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Developing flies jump without legs

Imagine jumping 25 times your body length in only 2.5 seconds. Impossible, right? Now imagine making that jump with no running start, having just gotten out of bed…and with no legs. Though utterly impossible for humans ...

Bio-inspired suction cups withstand more than splashes

Suction cups are getting a facelift. A shower caddy full of shampoo plopping into the bathtub may be an inconvenience in most cases, but failures like this limit the application of suction cups for more exacting purposes. ...

Bats avoid collisions by calling less in a crowd

In the warm summer months, bats go about their business each night, flying and gobbling up insects (a benefit to us). Using echolocation (making calls and listening for returning echoes to figure out where objects are) they ...

Snakes show that eating can be bad for your health

Eating is essential for life. Animals must eat to live, grow, and reproduce. But like most things, eating comes with tradeoffs. Dr. Zach Stahlschmidt of the University of the Pacific and his colleagues have found that along ...

Bugs and flowers inspire new cocktail curiosities

Your mother probably warned against playing with your food, but she may have neglected to mention playing with your drinks. Dr. Lisa Burton, a scientist from MIT, thankfully missed that lesson. Inspired by a love of experimental ...

Braving the cold to understand what makes squirrels tick

For most of us, our day begins with an alarm of some sort. We work, eat, and play, all on some sort of a schedule. While our world is dictated by mechanical clocks, the schedule of the non-human animal kingdom is largely ...

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