RIKEN is a large natural sciences research institute in Japan. Founded in 1917, it now has approximately 3000 scientists on seven campuses across Japan, the main one in Wako, just outside Tokyo. RIKEN is an Independent Administrative Institution whose formal name is Rikagaku Kenkyusho. RIKEN conducts research in many areas of science, including physics, chemistry, biology, medical science, engineering and computational science, and ranging from basic research to practical applications. It is almost entirely funded by the Japanese government, and its annual budget is approximately 88 billion yen (US$760 million).

Address
2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan
Website
http://www.riken.jp/en/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RIKEN

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Subscribe to rss feed

Early protostar already has a warped disk

Using observations from the ALMA radio observatory in Chile, researchers have observed, for the first time, a warped disk around an infant protostar that formed just several tens of thousands of years ago. This implies that ...

Protons and antiprotons appear to be true mirror images

In a stringent test of a fundamental property of the standard model of particle physics, known as CPT symmetry, researchers from the RIKEN-led BASE collaboration at CERN have made the most precise measurements so far of the ...

Evidence for a new nuclear 'magic number'

Researchers have come one step closer to understanding unstable atomic nuclei. A team of researchers from RIKEN, the University of Tokyo and other institutions in Japan and Italy has provided evidence for a new nuclear magic ...

Long predicted but never observed: A new kind of quantum junction

A new type of quantum bit called a "phase-slip qubit", devised by researchers at the RIKEN Advanced Science Institute and their collaborators, has enabled the world's first-ever experimental demonstration of coherent quantum ...

Flies smell through a Gore-Tex system

A research group led by a scientist of the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) has gained important insights into the nanopores that allow the fruit fly to detect chemicals in the air, and has identified the ...

page 1 from 54