The Polish Academy of Sciences, headquartered in Warsaw, is one of two Polish institutions having the nature of an academy of sciences. The Polish Academy of Sciences (Polish: Polska Akademia Nauk, abbreviated PAN) is a Polish state learned institution, headquartered in Warsaw, that was established in 1952 by the merger of earlier learned societies, including the Polish Academy of Learning (Polska Akademia Umiejętności, abbreviated PAU), with its seat in Kraków, and the Warsaw Society of Friends of Learning, which had been founded in the late 18th century. The Polish Academy of Sciences functions as a learned society acting through an elected corporation of leading scholars and research institutions. The Academy has also, operating through its committees, become a major scientific advisory body. Another aspect of the Academy is its coordination and overseeing of numerous (several dozens) of research institutes. PAN institutes employ over 2,000 people, and are funded by about a third of the Polish government's budget for science. In 1989, the Polish Academy of Learning, in Kraków, resumed its independent existence, separate from the Polish Academy of Sciences, in Warsaw.

Website
http://www.english.pan.pl/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_Academy_of_Sciences

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The first one-bit chemical memory unit—the 'chit'

In classical computer science, information is stored in bits; in quantum computer science, information is stored in quantum bits, or qubits. Experiments at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences ...

The mysterious 'action at a distance' between liquid containers

For several years, it has been known that superfluid helium housed in reservoirs located next to each other acts collectively, even when the channels connecting the reservoirs are too narrow and too long to allow for substantial ...

A 'Star Wars' laser bullet

Action-packed science-fiction movies often feature colourful laser bolts. But what would a real laser missile look like during flight, if we could only make it out? How would it illuminate its surroundings? The answers lie ...

Cosmic inflation: Higgs says goodbye to his 'little brother'

In the first moments after the Big Bang, the universe expanded many billions of times faster than today. Such rapid expansion is likely due to a primordial force field acting with a new particle, the inflaton. From the latest ...

The art of amplification: A desktop-size 10 terawatt laser

A compact new generation optical amplifier has been constructed by physicists from the Laser Centre of the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences and the Faculty of Physics of the Warsaw University. ...

The potential harbingers of new physics persist in LHC data

For some time now, researchers have noted several anomalies in the decays of beauty mesons in the data coming in from the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Are they more than just statistical fluctuations? The ...

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