Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world. It is a department of the University of Oxford and is governed by a group of 15 academics appointed by the Vice-Chancellor known as the Delegates of the Press. They are headed by the Secretary to the Delegates, who serves as OUP's chief executive and as its major representative on other university bodies. Oxford University has used a similar system to oversee the Press since the 17th century. The university became involved in the print trade around 1480, and grew into a major printer of Bibles, prayer books, and scholarly works. Its Press took on the project which became the Oxford English Dictionary in the late 19th century, and expanded to meet the ever-rising costs of the work. As a result, the last hundred years has seen Oxford publish children's books, school text books, music, journals, the World's Classics series, and a best-selling range of English Language Teaching texts to match its academic and religious titles. Moves into international markets led to the Press opening its own offices outside the United Kingdom, beginning with New York in 1896.

Address
Great Clarendon Street, Oxford, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Website
http://www.oup.com/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford_University_Press

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Subscribe to rss feed

New research shows how octopuses may have evolved

A new paper in Genome Biology and Evolution indicates that a type of octopus appears to have evolved independently to develop something resembling a shell, despite having lost the genetic code that produced actual shells ...

Study finds expanding voting rights can reduce violence

A new paper in the Journal of the European Economic Association, published by Oxford University Press, indicates that the extension of voting rights can reduce political violence. The researcher finds this by looking at the ...

What Harry Potter can (and can't) teach us about economics

A new paper in Oxford Open Economics, published by Oxford University Press, explores "Potterian economics"—the economics of the world of J.K. Rawling's Harry Potter series. Comparing such economics with professional economic ...

New study shows welfare prevents crime, quite dramatically

A new paper in the Quarterly Journal of Economics indicates that removing cash welfare from children when they reach age 18 greatly increases the chances that they will face criminal justice charges in subsequent years. ...

More gender segregation in jobs means more harassment, lower pay

A new paper in The Quarterly Journal of Economics, published by Oxford University Press, indicates that people who are the gender minority in their workplace are more likely to experience sexual harassment. This harassment ...

page 1 from 22