Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located near Knoxville, Tennessee is the Department of Energy's largest science and technology lab in the nation. It is managed by UT-Battelle. ORNL has six primary missions; neutron science, energy, high-performance computing, systems biology, materials science and national security. ORNL employs over 4,000 scientists, researchers and support staff for the lab. ORNL does other assignments for the Department of Energy which include isotope production, information management and assists other agencies of government. Current research includes advanced testing techniques for eye disease and disorder and sponsorship of the Global Venture Challenge for university students. ORNL welcomes inquiries and suggests stories for writers. The ORNL Review is a periodic journal of the latest in scientific and technology develops and is available on-line.

Address
1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge, TN 37830
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Microscopy—biomass close-up

Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientists created an approach to get a better look at plant cell wall characteristics at high resolution as they create more efficient, less costly methods to deconstruct biomass.

dateApr 03, 2017 in Biotechnology
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Batteries—quick coatings

Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are using the precision of an electron beam to instantly adhere cathode coatings for lithium-ion batteries—a leap in efficiency that saves energy, reduces production and capital ...

dateApr 03, 2017 in Energy & Green Tech
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Computing—quantum deep

In a first for deep learning, an Oak Ridge National Laboratory-led team is bringing together quantum, high-performance and neuromorphic computing architectures to address complex issues that, if resolved, could clear the ...

dateApr 03, 2017 in Computer Sciences
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A seismic mapping milestone

Because of Earth's layered composition, scientists have often compared the basic arrangement of its interior to that of an onion. There's the familiar thin crust of continents and ocean floors; the thick mantle of hot, semisolid ...

dateMar 28, 2017 in Earth Sciences
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