The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, commonly known as NTNU, is located in Trondheim. NTNU is the second largest of the eight universities in Norway, and, as its name suggests, has the main national responsibility for higher education in engineering and technology. In addition to engineering and the natural and physical sciences, the university offers advanced degrees in other academic disciplines ranging from the social sciences, the arts, medicine, architecture and fine art.

Website
http://www.ntnu.edu/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norwegian_University_of_Science_and_Technology

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The hidden threat of the home office

It may seem a bit contradictory at first glance, but increased flexibility in our workday may have given us less flexibility in the work itself.

Battling harmful insects by understanding their sense of smell

In NTNU's Dragvoll laboratory in Trondheim, researchers keep different things in the closet than most of us do. Jars of moths stand in rows. The insects are actually pretty cute, but the Norwegian name for them suggests that ...

Great progress for electronic gadgets of the future

Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) have found a completely new method to check the electronic properties of oxide materials. This opens the door to even tinier components and perhaps ...

Red fox displaces Arctic fox thanks to littering

Animal species that are at home in the high mountains are finding their habitats reduced and fragmented by roads. In addition, they face competition from scavengers from lower boreal areas that find their way to the mountains.

Fish waste as a raw input for industrial goods

The raw materials left after a salmon has been fileted are equivalent to more than 60 percent of its slaughtered weight. It will soon be possible to convert these into a high-quality fish oil, taste-neutral fish proteins, ...

Viking sword found in grave in central Norway

During the Viking Age—probably sometime in the 800s-900s—a man died in the village we call Vinjeøra today, south of Trøndelag county. He was buried with a full set of weapons: ax, spear, shield and sword.

Why aren't sea trout thriving anymore?

Sea trout get no peace. They're constantly exposed to new diseases and ailments, many of which are due to climate change and human activity.

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