The Niels Bohr Institute is a research institute of the University of Copenhagen. The research of the institute spans astronomy, geophysics, nanotechnology, particle physics, quantum mechanics and biophysics. The Institute was founded in 1921, as the Institute for Theoretical Physics of the University of Copenhagen, by the Danish theoretical physicist Niels Bohr, who had been on the staff of the University of Copenhagen since 1914, and who had been lobbying for its creation since his appointment as professor in 1916. On the 80th anniversary of Niels Bohr's birth - October 7, 1965 - the Institute officially became The Niels Bohr Institute. Some of its original funding came from the Carlsberg brewery. During the 1920s, and 1930s, the Institute was the center of the developing disciplines of atomic physics and quantum physics. Physicists from across Europe (and sometimes further abroad) often visited the Institute to confer with Bohr on new theories and discoveries. The Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics is named after work done at the Institute during this time.

Address
Blegdamsvej 17, Copenhagen, Region Hovedstaden, Denmark
Website
http://www.nbi.ku.dk
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niels_Bohr_Institute

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Conceptual model explains how thunderstorm clouds bunch together

Understanding the weather and climate change is one of the most important challenges in science today. A new theoretical study from Associate Professor Jan Härter at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, presents ...

Active noise control for a quantum drum

Researchers at the Schliesser Lab at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have demonstrated a new way to address a central problem in quantum physics: at the quantum scale, any measurement disturbs the measured ...

The early universe was a fluid quark-gluon plasma

Scientists from the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, and their colleagues from the international ALICE collaboration recently collided xenon nuclei, in order to gain new insights into the properties of the ...

Boosting gravitational wave detectors with quantum tricks

A group of scientists from the Niels Bohr Institute (NBI) at the University of Copenhagen will soon start developing a new line of technical equipment in order to dramatically improve gravitational wave detectors.

Researchers report success with complex quantum states

Scientists from the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen have, for the first time, succeeded in producing, controlling and understanding complex quantum states based on two electron spins connected to a superconductor. ...

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