National Institute of Standards and Technology

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) was established in 1901. NIST is a non-regulatory agency of the U.S. Government attached to the Department of Commerce. The headquarters is in Gaithersburg, Maryland and the other facility is in Boulder, Colorado. NIST purpose is to advance innovation in measurement, calibration, standards, science in the U.S. From microwaves to electronic voting machines involve technology and standards. A primary component NIST pays close attention to is national security. NIST is divided into areas of physics, information technology, chemical science and technology, electronic and electronic engineering, material sciences, building and fire research.

Address
NIST, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 1070, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-1070
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NIST metrology and the maple syrup industry

NIST is frequently asked to provide unusual, sometimes downright exotic, measurements and calibrations in support of U.S. commerce. But even old hands in the Fluid Metrology Group were surprised last fall when they were called ...

dateJan 05, 2017 in General Physics
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Busting myths about the metric system

This week is the 41st anniversary of the Metric Conversion Act, which was signed on December 23, 1975, by President Gerald R. Ford. Normally, we celebrate by sharing metric education resources, but this year I want to use ...

dateDec 27, 2016 in General Physics
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How to tell when a nanoparticle is out of shape

Nanoparticles—those with diameters less than one-thousandth the width of a human hair—are increasingly prevalent in high technology, medicine, and consumer goods. Their characteristics, both desirable and undesirable, ...

dateDec 21, 2016 in Nanophysics
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Device for detecting subatomic-scale motion

Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new device that measures the motion of super-tiny particles traversing distances almost unimaginably small—shorter than the diameter ...

dateDec 16, 2016 in Nanophysics
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