Michigan State University

Michigan State University (MSU) was established in 1855 and is located in East Lansing, Michigan. The student body exceeds 40,000 students and includes undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees. MSU's work in technology, science and engineering is ranked high in the USA. MSU's graduate school in nuclear physics was recently named the 2nd highest school of its kind in the U.S. MSU is consistently rated in the Top 100 of public universities and is particularly noted for its high retention rate for undergraduate students.

Address
403 Olds Hall • East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1047
E-mail
Layne.Cameron@ur.msu.edu
Website
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Study links gang membership and depression

Kids who decide to join gangs are more likely to be depressed and suicidal - and these mental health problems only worsen after joining, finds a new study co-authored by a Michigan State University criminologist.

dateApr 13, 2016 in Social Sciences
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Team tackles mystery of protein folding

Proteins are the workhorses of life, mediating almost all biological events in every life form. Scientists know how proteins are structured, but folding - how they are built - still holds many mysteries.

dateMar 31, 2016 in Biochemistry
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What's holding black entrepreneurs back?

It's not laziness or lack of initiative that's keeping African-Americans from starting their own businesses, but instead a centuries-old racial disadvantage that's not experienced by other minority groups, a Michigan State ...

dateMar 31, 2016 in Economics & Business
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Widespread sexual harassment persists in India

Sexual harassment remains a pervasive problem in India despite tougher laws enacted more than three years ago after a woman was gang raped on a bus and later died of her injuries, indicates new research by a Michigan State ...

dateMar 28, 2016 in Social Sciences
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What's in a name? In some cases, longer life

Black men with historically distinctive black names such as Elijah and Moses lived a year longer, on average, than other black men, according to new research examining 3 million death certificates from 1802 to 1970.

dateMar 25, 2016 in Social Sciences
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