Linguistic Society of America

The Linguistic Society of America (LSA) is a professional society for linguists. It was founded in 1924 to advance linguistics, the scientific study of human language. The LSA has over 5,000 individual members and welcomes linguists of all kinds. It works to advance the discipline and to communicate findings in linguistics to a wider audience. Through its website, its annual and summer meetings, its biennial summer institutes, and its journal Language, the LSA works to disseminate current research in linguistics and facilitate communication within the discipline. The Society also participates in the public discourse on language and linguistic issues, contributing to policy debates on issues such as bilingual education, "Ebonics", and the English-only movement. The first president of the LSA was Hermann Collitz, elected in 1925. Many prominent linguists have served in this position, including Franz Boas (1928), Edward Sapir (1933), Zellig Harris (1955), Roman Jakobson (1956), Mary Haas (1963), Morris Halle (1974), Peter Ladefoged (1978) and Joan Bybee (2004) among others. The current president of the LSA (2012) is Keren Rice.

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The 'reality' of accent change

A new study of how accents change over differing periods of time demonstrates the limited impact of intense social interactions in isolated environments, and surprisingly large differences among people in how susceptible ...

dateSep 01, 2017 in Social Sciences
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The hazards of English spelling

A new study of English spelling practices demonstrates that the way we spell words is much more orderly and self-organizing than previously thought. The study "Self-organization in the spelling of English suffixes: The emergence ...

dateMar 10, 2017 in Other
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Black language matters: A linguistic analysis

A new scientific study reveals the critical role that dialect unfamiliarity and prejudice against speakers of African American Vernacular English [AAVE] and other non-standard dialects can play in the criminal justice system. ...

dateDec 20, 2016 in Social Sciences
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