The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is the largest research and education institution in Germany, resulting from a merger of the university (Universität Karlsruhe (TH)) and the research center (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe) of the city of Karlsruhe. The university, also known as Fridericiana, was founded in 1825. In 2009, it merged with the former national nuclear research center founded in 1956 as the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK). One of nine German Excellence Universities, the KIT is one of the leading universities in science and engineering in Europe, ranking 6th overall in terms of citation impact. The University of Karlsruhe was founded as Polytechnische Schule, a polytechnical school, on 7 October 1825. It was modeled upon the École polytechnique in Paris. In 1865, Grand Duke Frederick I of Baden (German: Friedrich) raised the school to the status of a Hochschule, an institution of higher education. Since 1902 the university has also been known as the Fridericiana in his honour.

Address
Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
Website
http://www.kit.edu
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karlsruhe_Institute_of_Technology

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Bioeconomy: Taking microbes out of dark and into the light

Microorganisms are the oldest, most abundant, and most diverse life forms on earth and offer enormous potential for biotechnological applications. To date, however, only a fraction of them could be isolated and cultivated. ...

Sweet sorghum promising for the environment

Sweet sorghum can be used to produce biogas, biofuels, and novel polymers. In addition, it can help replace phosphate fertilizers. A new sweet sorghum variety developed at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) accumulates ...

Novel materials: Sound waves traveling backward

Acoustic waves in gases, liquids, and solids usually travel at an almost constant speed of sound. So-called rotons are an exception: their speed of sound changes significantly with the wavelength, and it is also possible ...

Improved climate resilience through better seasonal forecasts

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Machine learning speeds up simulations in material science

Research, development, and production of novel materials depend heavily on the availability of fast and at the same time accurate simulation methods. Machine learning, in which artificial intelligence (AI) autonomously acquires ...

Water treatment: Removing hormones with sunlight

Organic pollutants such as pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and hormones, even at nanoscale concentrations, contaminate drinking water in a way that poses significant risks to humans, animals and the environment. In particular, ...

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In nature, scents emitted by plants attract animals such as insects. However, scents are also used in the industry, for example in the production of perfumes and aromas. In order to achieve a reliable, quick, and objective ...

Electron beam melting gets brittle metal into shape

Tungsten has the highest melting point of all metals, 3,422 degrees Celsius. This makes the material ideal for use at high temperatures in e.g. space rocket nozzles, heating elements of high-temperature furnaces, or the fusion ...

Shopping online or locally—an individual choice

The obstacles associated with shopping, such as shipping costs or the time needed to go to the shop, are crucial to the individual choice of where to shop. When deciding between online shopping and local shopping, personal ...

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