The John Innes Centre (JIC) located in Norwich, Norfolk, England is an independent centre for research and training in plant and microbial science. It is a registered charity (No 223852) grant-aided by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and is a member of the Norwich Research Park. The John Innes Horticultural Institution was founded in 1910 at Merton Park, Surrey (now London Borough of Merton), with funds bequeathed by John Innes, a merchant and philanthropist. The Institution occupied Innes's former estate at Merton Park until 1945 when it moved to Bayfordbury, Hertfordshire. It moved to its present site in 1967. John Innes Compost was developed by the institution in the 1930s. In the 1980s, the administration of the John Innes Institute was combined with that of the Plant Breeding Institute and the Nitrogen Fixation Laboratory. In 1994, following the relocation of the operations of other two organisations to the Norwich site, the three were merged as the John Innes Centre.

Website
http://www.jic.ac.uk
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Innes_Centre

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Bacteria can tell the time

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