Towards new IT devices with stable and transformable solitons

Unavoidably, each digital information we send around the globe is prone to be lost. Travelling long ways in wires, the initial signal decays and scatters by colliding with impurities and neighboring electromagnetic fields. ...

Explaining how 2-D materials break at the atomic level

We are familiar with cracks in big or small three-dimensional (3-D) objects, but how do thin, two-dimensional (2-D) materials crack? 2-D materials like molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), have emerged as an important asset for future ...

First experimental proof of a 70 year old physics theory

PARK Je-Geun, Associate Director at the Center for Correlated Electron Systems and collaborators have demonstrated the magnetic behavior of a special class of 2-D materials. This is the first experimental proof to a theory ...

How plants decide that it is time to flower

When spring is approaching, how do plants decide that it is time to flower? A team of plant scientists led by KWAK June M. at the Center for Plant Aging Research, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) unravelled a ...

An amino acid controls plants' breath

Plants breathe and "sweat" through stomata, microscopic pores found on leaves, stems and other plant organs. Through the stomata, plants take up carbon dioxide for photosynthesis and breathe out the products of this process, ...

Black phosphorus doesn't mind de-aerated water

Researchers at the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials (CMCM), within the Institute for Basic Science(IBS) have discovered that one of graphene's competitors, black phosphorus, is inert to water deprived of oxygen, ...

The thinnest photodetector in the world

The Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) has developed the world's thinnest photodetector, that is a device that converts light into an electric current. With a thickness ...

page 8 from 11