The Institut Laue–Langevin, or ILL, is an internationally-financed scientific facility, situated in Grenoble, France. It is one of the world centres for research using neutrons. Founded in 1967 and honouring the physicists Max von Laue and Paul Langevin, the ILL currently provides one of the most intense neutron sources in the world and the most intense continuous neutron flux in the world in the moderator region: 1.5x10 neutrons per second per cm, with a thermal power of 58.3 MW. The ILL neutron scattering facilities provide an indispensable analytical tool for the analysis of the structure of novel conducting and magnetic materials for future electronic devices, the measurement of stresses in mechanical materials, and investigations into how complex molecular assemblies behave, particularly in a biological environment. The ILL also tackles questions relating to the fundamental properties of matter. The institute was founded by France and Germany, with the United Kingdom becoming the third major partner in 1973.

Website
http://www.ill.eu/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Institut_Laue%E2%80%93Langevin

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