The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU, Chinese: 香港理工大學) specialises in professional education in Hong Kong. The University’s teaching units are grouped under six faculties and two schools; the Faculty of Applied Science and Textiles, Faculty of Business, Faculty of Construction and Environment, Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Faculty of Humanities, alongside with School of Design and School of Hotel and Tourism Management. The University is the sole provider of full-time degree or higher diploma programmes in Hong Kong in the following areas: computing and management, design, engineering physics, fashion and textiles, geomatics, international shipping and transport logistics, medical laboratory science, optometry, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and radiography. The University maintains strong partnership with the business and industrial sectors. The current President of the University is Prof. Timothy W. Tong. Prof. Chung-Kwong Poon retired on 31 December 2008 and the University Council decided to confer the title of "President Emeritus" on him in recognition of his dedicated and distinguished service to the University.

Address
Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Website
http://www.polyu.edu.hk/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hong_Kong_Polytechnic_University

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Subscribe to rss feed

New research may explain shortages within STEM careers

A new study by the University of Georgia revealed that more college students change majors within the STEM pipeline than leave the career path of science, technology, engineering and mathematics altogether.

Earliest forest fires evidence of ancient tree expansion

The Earth's first forest fires appear to have occurred earlier than previously thought, pointing out a link between widespread wildfires and ancient tree evolution, according to researchers at The University of Alabama.

Bears that mark more trees may be more successful in mating

Brown bears that are more inclined to grate and rub against trees have more offspring and more mates, according to a University of Alberta study. The results suggest there might be a fitness component to the poorly understood ...

page 1 from 6