The Graz University of Technology (German: Technische Universität Graz, short TU Graz) is the second largest university in Styria, Austria, after the University of Graz. Austria has three universities of technology – in Graz, in Leoben, and in Vienna. The Graz University of Technology was founded in 1811 by Archduke John of Austria. TUG, as the university is called by its students, is a public university. In the academic year 2010/11, 11,681 students were enrolled at the TUG. 14.8% of the students were from abroad and 21.4% of the students were female.

Website
http://www.tugraz.at/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graz_University_of_Technology

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Switching nanomagnets using infrared lasers

When molecules are irradiated with infrared light, they begin to vibrate due to the energy supply. For Andreas Hauser from the Institute of Experimental Physics at Graz University of Technology (TU Graz), this well-known ...

Novel UV broadband spectrometer improves air pollutant analysis

Sunlight has a major influence on chemical processes. Its high-energy UV radiation in particular is strongly absorbed by all materials and triggers photochemical reactions of the substances present in the air. A well-known ...

New method for analyzing nanoporous materials

In addition to their main components, the properties of crystalline and nanoporous materials often depend crucially on guest atoms or ions that are embedded in the tiny pores of their lattice structure. This applies to high-tech ...

Research team develops a more durable coating against ice

Ice-repellent coatings have been around for some time, but until now they have been very sensitive and detach quite quickly from the surfaces they are meant to protect. A research team led by Anna Maria Coclite and Gabriel ...

Blue light: An on-off switch for enzymes

Light affects living organisms in many different ways, for example, plants orient their growth direction towards the sun, while circadian rhythms in humans are controlled by daylight. These processes always involve photoreceptors, ...

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