The Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI) is part of the Novartis Research Foundation and is a world-class center for basic research in life sciences based in Basel, Switzerland. The FMI is devoted to the pursuit of fundamental biomedical research. Areas of expertise are: In these fields the FMI has gained international recognition as a center of excellence in innovative biomedical research. Research is carried out in 22 independent but highly interactive research teams. In addition, seven technology platforms, ranging from functional genomics to microscopy and imaging, support the research activities with cutting-edge technology. As of 2011, the institute counts 320 collaborators of which 90 are postgraduate students participating in the FMI International PhD Program, 100 are postdoctoral collaborators and 22 are research group leaders. Since 2004, the institute is led by Susan M. Gasser. in chronological order The FMI is an affiliated institute of the University of Basel. It provides biomedical research and career training for over 90 PhD students. FMI selects its highly international student body during a twice-yearly interview-based selection program.

Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/index.html?curid=33161449
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedrich_Miescher_Institute_for_Biomedical_Research

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Subscribe to rss feed

Video: Watching how cells deal with stress

FMI researchers developed an imaging approach that allowed them to visualize individual molecules involved in the cell's response to stress.

How animals reach their correct size

Even small differences in how fast animals grow during development can sum up to large differences in their adult body size. Nevertheless, adults of the same species are usually nearly identical in size. Benjamin Towbin, ...

Thwarting cellular enzyme can fight viral infections

FMI researchers have identified a synthetic protein that dampens the activity of a cellular pathway involved in viral infection. The findings could help to develop drugs that combat viruses such as influenza A and Zika.

Structural insights into the assembly of cilia

Cilia, the little "hairs" attached to almost all cells of the human body, play a role in various cellular functions and cause diseases called ciliopathies when they are defective. Researchers from the group of Patrick Matthias ...

The neuronal mechanism behind motivation

Our actions are motivated by the goals we want to achieve. However, little is known about the mechanism in our brains that allow us to make the right decisions to reach our goals. Researchers in the Lüthi lab now identified ...

Mechanical forces shape the 'immortal' hydra

Hydras are tiny creatures with regenerative superpowers: they can renew their stem cells and replace damaged body parts in only a few days. Now, researchers in the Tsiairis group have found that mechanical forces turn on ...

A histone modification essential for tissue integrity

Chemical modifications of histones, the small proteins around which DNA is wrapped, are known to affect gene expression. In a study conducted in C. elegans, researchers from the Gasser group show that the defining modification ...

Worm atlas could help crack mysteries in animal evolution

Researchers in the Friedrich group have contributed to create an atlas that links subcellular structures to gene expression in each cell of the sea worm Platynereis dumerilii, a key model organism for the study of development ...

How proteins bind 'hidden' DNA

How can proteins bind DNA in the cell nucleus, where it is present in form of chromatin, tightly wrapped around histones and therefore mostly inaccessible? Recently, several studies began to uncover the various strategies ...

page 1 from 7