The Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FVB) was formed in 1992. It comprises eight research institutes. The institutes operate autonomously, but with a single common administration. About 1200 scientists and support staff are employed collectively and the institutes are funded 50/50 by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research and the State of Berlin. The research is highly complex and spans the spectrum of scientific inquiry, including advanced optics, microwave, and applied sciences.

Address
Rudover Chaussee 17, 12489 Berlin, Germany
Website
http://www.fv-berlin.de/index.html
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferdinand-Braun-Institut

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An 88 percent decline in large freshwater animals

Rivers and lakes cover just about one percent of Earth's surface, but are home to one third of all vertebrate species worldwide. At the same time, freshwater life is highly threatened. Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute ...

Climate changes faster than animals adapt

Climate change can threaten species, and extinctions can impact ecosystem health. It is therefore of vital importance to assess to which degree animals can respond to changing environmental conditions, for example, by shifting ...

Accurate probing of magnetism with light

Probing magnetic materials with extreme ultraviolet radiation allows to obtain a detailed microscopic picture of how magnetic systems interact with light—the fastest way to manipulate a magnetic material. A team of researchers ...

Sustainable fisheries and conservation policy

There are roughly five times as many recreational fishers as commercial fishers throughout the world. And yet, the needs and peculiarities of these 220 million recreational fishers have largely been ignored in international ...

How female hyaenas came to dominate males

In most animal societies, members of one sex dominate those of the other. Is this, as widely believed, an inevitable consequence of a disparity in strength and ferocity between males and females? Not necessarily. A new study ...

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