ETH Zurich

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Little Ice Age displaced the tropical rain belt

The tropical rain belt, also known as the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), is in a state of constant migration. It continuously changes position in response to the seasons and follows the sun's zenith, with a slight ...

dateApr 24, 2017 in Earth Sciences
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Nanoparticles remain unpredictable

The way that nanoparticles behave in the environment is extremely complex. There is currently a lack of systematic experimental data to help understand them comprehensively, as ETH environmental scientists have shown in a ...

dateApr 19, 2017 in Bio & Medicine
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Chaining up diarrhoea pathogens

Researchers have clarified how vaccinations can combat bacterial intestinal diseases: vaccine-induced antibodies in the intestine chain up pathogens as they grow in the intestine, which prevents disease and surprisingly also ...

dateApr 18, 2017 in Cell & Microbiology
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The cooling effect of agricultural irrigation

Previously, scientists have suggested that agricultural irrigation affects mean climate in several regions of the world. New evidence now shows that this cooling influence is even more pronounced when it comes to climate ...

dateApr 12, 2017 in Environment
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Platelets instead of quantum dots

A team of researchers led by ETH Zurich professor David Norris has developed a model to clarify the general mechanism of nanoplatelet formation. Using pyrite, they also managed to confirm their theory.

dateApr 04, 2017 in Nanophysics
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Nanomagnets for future data storage

An international team of researchers led by chemists from ETH Zurich have developed a method for depositing single magnetisable atoms onto a surface. This is especially interesting for the development of new miniature data ...

dateMar 30, 2017 in Materials Science
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Inflammation awakens sleepers

The inflammatory response that is supposed to ward off pathogens that cause intestinal disease makes this even worse. This is because special viruses integrate their genome into Salmonella, which further strengthens the pathogen.

dateMar 28, 2017 in Cell & Microbiology
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