ETH Zurich

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Selenium deficiency promoted by climate change

Selenium is an essential micronutrient obtained from dietary sources such as cereals. The selenium content of foodstuffs largely depends on concentrations in the soil: previous studies have shown that low selenium concentrations ...

dateFeb 20, 2017 in Environment
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Laissez-faire is not good enough for reforestation

If degraded and logged areas of tropical forests are left to nature, the populations of certain endangered tree species are not able to recover. This applies in particular to trees with large fruit where the seeds are distributed ...

dateFeb 15, 2017 in Ecology
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Success by deception

Theoretical physicists from ETH Zurich deliberately misled intelligent machines, and thus refined the process of machine learning. They created a new method that allows computers to categorize data—even when humans have ...

dateFeb 13, 2017 in Quantum Physics
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Tiny organisms with massive impact

Diatoms are a very common group of algae found not only in freshwater streams, rivers and lakes, but also in marine waters. These unicellular organisms are particularly prevalent in the waters of the Southern Ocean around ...

dateFeb 07, 2017 in Earth Sciences
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Miraculous proliferation

Bacteria able to shed their cell wall assume new, mostly spherical shapes. ETH researchers have shown that these cells, known as L-forms, are not only viable but that their reproductive mechanisms may even correspond to those ...

dateDec 07, 2016 in Cell & Microbiology
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Starch from yeast

Researchers at ETH Zurich have produced starch in yeast—the first time this has been achieved in a non-plant organism. The new model system now makes it easier for them to investigate how starch is formed and what role ...

dateNov 23, 2016 in Biotechnology
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Award for innovative cell culture technology

Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a new cell culture method, which may very well enable to forgo certain tests on animals in the future. The scientists were awarded an international prize for more humane treatment ...

dateNov 03, 2016 in Biotechnology
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Hot on the heels of quasiparticles

Electrons in a solid can team up to form so-called quasiparticles, which lead to new phenomena. Physicists at ETH in Zurich have now studied previously unidentified quasiparticles in a new class of atomically thin semiconductors. ...

dateNov 02, 2016 in Quantum Physics
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