Edith Cowan University (ECU) is located in Perth, Western Australia. It was named after the first woman to be elected to an Australian Parliament, Edith Cowan, and is the only Australian university named after a woman. ECU is situated in Western Australia, with approximately 20,000 students at undergraduate and postgraduate level, approximately 4000 of whom are international students originating from over 90 countries outside Australia. ECU was granted university status in 1991 and was formed from an amalgamation of teachers' colleges with a history dating back to 1902 when the Claremont Teachers College was established; making ECU the modern descendant of the first institution of higher education in Western Australia. The university offers more than 400 courses across two metropolitan campuses, in Mount Lawley and Joondalup, and a regional campus in the South West, Bunbury, 200 km south of Perth; with some courses also offered for study off-campus (Distance Education).

Address
585 Robertson Dr., Bunbury, Western Australia, Australia 6230
Website
http://www.ecu.edu.au/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edith_Cowan_University

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Taking Australia's homegrown superfood mainstream

Lupins have long been touted as the next superfood, combatting heart disease, diabetes and obesity and new research from Edith Cowan University (ECU) has taken an important step to make that a reality.

Common weed could spell bellyache for gluten intolerant

New research has identified proteins in a common weed which could play havoc for Australian farmers growing gluten-free crops, such as millet, buckwheat and sorghum, and people suffering from gluten intolerance.

Putting bugs on the menu, safely

The thought of eating insects is stomach turning for many, but new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research is shedding light on allergy causing proteins which could pose serious health risks for those suffering from shellfish ...

Bees? Please. These plants are putting ants to work

In a world first, ECU researchers have discovered a plant that has successfully evolved to use ants—as well as native bees—as pollinating agents by overcoming their antimicrobial defenses.

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