The Ecological Society of America (ESA) is a professional organization of ecological scientists. Based in the United States, ESA publishes a suite of publications, from peer-reviewed journals to newsletters, fact sheets and teaching resources. It holds an annual meeting at different locations in the USA and Canada. In addition to its publications and annual meeting, ESA is engaged in public policy, science, and education and diversity issues. ESA's 10,000 members are researchers, educators, natural resource managers, and students in over 90 countries. Members work on a wide range of topics, from agroecology to marine diversity and explore the relationships between organisms and their past, present, and future environments. The Society has over 20 topical sections and seven regional chapters, reflecting the breadth of interests and activities of its members.

Website
http://www.esa.org/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecological_Society_of_America

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Picky pathogens help non-native tree species invade

Walk into a forest comprising only native trees, and you probably notice many different tree species around you, with no one species dominating the ecosystem. Such biodiversity—the variety of life and species in the forest—ensures ...

Lionfish ear-bones reveal a more mobile invasion

Just as lions are apex predators on land, lionfish in Florida are an underwater force to be reckoned with. The biggest threat they pose, however, is not their venomous spines. It is the alarming speed and ferocity with which ...

Sneaky mating may be in female damselfies' interest

During the mating season, male damselflies battle fiercely for control of prime territories containing resources—typically patches of floating leaves used for egg deposition in wetlands—that are key to attracting females. ...

Pop-up parks deliver big benefits in small spaces

Pop-up stores, restaurants, and theaters are an increasingly common sight in cities around the world, where they add to the diversity of commercial options available to city dwellers. But while the pop-up phenomenon is normally ...

Exotic pets can become pests with risk of invasion

A large proportion of successful vertebrate invasions can be traced to the global exotic pet trade. However, surprisingly little is known about the economic, social, and ecological factors that shape the trade and how they ...

Woolly stars need catastrophes to live

A small, crunchy, spiny plant redefines toughness as it thrives on catastrophic flooding. The endangered Santa Ana Woolly Star does not just prosper with floods, though; it depends on them. Thanks to a huge dam, natural floods ...

Owls against owls in a challenge for survival

Scientists are puzzling out how to address the declining numbers of northern spotted owls (NSO) in their Pacific Northwest forest habitat. A new study in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecological Applications ...

New buzz around insect DNA analysis and biodiversity estimates

In the face of declining numbers of insects across the globe, scientists continue to expand our knowledge about invertebrate organisms and their biodiversity across the globe. Insects are the most abundant animals on planet ...

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