CSIRO

CSIRO, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization is Australia's governmental agency for scientific research. CSIRO was originally founded in 1926 as the Advisory Council of Science and Industry. CSIRO employs 6,000 scientists, technicians and support staff with 50 sites around Australia and labs in Mexico and France. CSIRO is divided into 16 operational divisions including but not limited to, Australia Telescope National Laboratory, Energy Technology, Entomology, Material Sciences and Engineering, Sustainable Ecosystems and Molecular and Health Technologies. CSIRO is noted for its work at the Darwin Laboratories, the invention of the Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, invention of the insect repellent Aerogar and a series of biological control inhibiting the spread of rabbit hemorrhagic disease. Media inquiries are welcome.

Address
CSIRO Enquiries,Bag 10 Clayton South VIC 3169, Australia
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Closing the phosphorous-efficiency gap

Ways to reduce the costs of phosphorus fertiliser use on farms – critical for sustaining high agricultural production in many Australian farming systems – have been identified in a new suite of journal papers.

dateOct 24, 2011 in Environment
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X-ray vision to characterise mineral ores

A new state of the art x-ray imaging detector smaller than a postage stamp is the key to a powerful new method of characterising mineral ores, according to an article published today in the October issue of CSIRO’s Process ...

dateOct 05, 2011 in Engineering
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A new leaf turns in carbon science

(PhysOrg.com) -- A new insight into global photosynthesis, the chemical process governing how ocean and land plants absorb and release carbon dioxide, has been revealed in research that will assist scientists to more accurately ...

dateSep 29, 2011 in Earth Sciences
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War on willows

Willows are major environmental weeds of riverbank habitats across much of south-eastern Australia. They obstruct water flow, increase water temperature, change water chemistry and can displace native riverine plant species.

dateJul 29, 2011 in Ecology
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Deep-ocean sentinels on northern climate watch

Three deep-ocean moorings have become the foundation for a new drive to measure change in currents linking the Pacific and Indian Oceans through the Indonesia Archipelago – a key factor influencing Australia’s climate.

dateJul 28, 2011 in Earth Sciences
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