Cranfield University is a British postgraduate and research-based university with two campuses. The main campus is at Cranfield, Bedfordshire and the second is the Defence Academy of the United Kingdom at Shrivenham, Oxfordshire. The main campus is unique in the United Kingdom for having an operational airport (Cranfield Airport) next to the main campus. The airport facilities are used by Cranfield University's own aircraft in the course of aerospace teaching and research. The university has connections in India and Australia. The university was formed in 1946 as the College of Aeronautics on the former Royal Air Force base of RAF Cranfield which opened in 1937. (See also entries on Harold Roxbee Cox, Sir Stafford Cripps and Roy Fedden, all individuals associated with the foundation of the original College of Aeronautics). Between 1955 and 1969 a period of diversification took place. In 1967 the college presented the Privy Council with a petition for the grant of a Royal Charter along with a draft charter for a new institution to be called Cranfield Institute of Technology.

Address
Cranfield, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom
Website
http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cranfield_University

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