Armagh Observatory is a modern astronomical research institute with a rich heritage, based in Armagh, Northern Ireland. Around 25 astronomers are actively studying stellar astrophysics, the Sun, Solar System astronomy, and the Earth's climate. The Observatory is located close to the centre of the city of Armagh, adjacent to the Armagh Planetarium in approximately 14 acres (57,000 m) of landscaped grounds known as the Armagh Astropark, and was founded in 1789 by Richard Robinson, Archbishop of Armagh. Ernst Julius Öpik (grandfather of Lembit Öpik MP) was based here for over 30 years and among his many contributions to astrophysics he wrote of the dangers of an asteroid impacting on the Earth. There are scale models of the Solar System and the Universe, two sundials and historic telescopes, as well as telescope domes and other outdoor exhibits. The Human Orrery, launched in 2004, is located close to the main Observatory building. The Observatory's specialist library and archives, and collections of scientific instruments and artefacts associated with the development of modern astronomy, represent one of the leading collections of its kind in the British Isles.

Website
http://star.arm.ac.uk/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armagh_Observatory

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The largest-ever catalog of gravitational waves released

One of humankind's greatest achievements was made on 14th Sept 2015 when the first direct detection of a gravitational wave event was made using the aLIGO observatories in Washington State and Louisana in the U.S.

Video: ESA's meteor camera captures the Perseid showers

The Perseids meteor shower is one of the most spectacular annual meteor showers. Made of debris from comet Swift-Tuttle they have been observed by sky-watchers for thousands of years and this year the LIC1 camera of the Canary ...

DY Centauri: Stellar evolution while you watch

In 1930, Dorrit Hoffleit reported that star number #4749 in the Harvard List of variables had faded four times between 1897 and 1929, and identified it as an R Coronae Borealis (RCB) variable. RCB stars are luminous low-mass ...

A solar-powered asteroid nursery at the orbit of Mars

The planet Mars shares its orbit with a handful of small asteroids, the so-called Trojans. Among them, one finds a unique group, all moving in very similar orbits, suggesting that they originated from the same object. But ...

Driest April for 35 years, dullest for 20 years

Armagh Observatory reports that April 2017 was much drier than average, and slightly warmer and much duller. This was the driest April at Armagh for 35 years and the sixth-driest April at Armagh since rainfall records began ...

A good year to view the Geminid meteor shower

This year´s Geminid meteor display, the best of the annual meteor showers, will be visible from approximately the 7th to 17th December, peaking on the evening of the 14th. The meteors, or 'shooting stars', which are best ...

Jupiter, Venus and Mars stand proud in the morning sky

Armagh Observatory reports that the next three weeks, from mid-October to the first week of November, will provide an interesting opportunity to observe a "dance" of the brightest planets Venus, Jupiter and Mars in the morning ...

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