Armagh Observatory

Armagh Observatory is a modern astronomical research institute with a rich heritage, based in Armagh, Northern Ireland. Around 25 astronomers are actively studying stellar astrophysics, the Sun, Solar System astronomy, and the Earth's climate. The Observatory is located close to the centre of the city of Armagh, adjacent to the Armagh Planetarium in approximately 14 acres (57,000 m) of landscaped grounds known as the Armagh Astropark, and was founded in 1789 by Richard Robinson, Archbishop of Armagh. Ernst Julius Öpik (grandfather of Lembit Öpik MP) was based here for over 30 years and among his many contributions to astrophysics he wrote of the dangers of an asteroid impacting on the Earth. There are scale models of the Solar System and the Universe, two sundials and historic telescopes, as well as telescope domes and other outdoor exhibits. The Human Orrery, launched in 2004, is located close to the main Observatory building. The Observatory's specialist library and archives, and collections of scientific instruments and artefacts associated with the development of modern astronomy, represent one of the leading collections of its kind in the British Isles.

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Driest April for 35 years, dullest for 20 years

Armagh Observatory reports that April 2017 was much drier than average, and slightly warmer and much duller. This was the driest April at Armagh for 35 years and the sixth-driest April at Armagh since rainfall records began ...

dateMay 08, 2017 in Environment
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Dance of the planets in the evening sky

Armagh Observatory reports that the next two weeks provide a rare opportunity to observe the planets Venus, Mars and Uranus in the western evening sky after sunset, and the bright planet Jupiter rising high in the East about ...

dateFeb 19, 2015 in Space Exploration
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Geminid meteors promise a fine display

The Geminid meteor shower is the last, and one of the best, major meteor showers of the year. The meteors, or "shooting stars", can be seen at any time from late evening onwards during the period 7–17 December and with ...

dateDec 03, 2014 in Space Exploration
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