Agricultural Research Service

The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) is the principal in-house research agency of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). ARS is one of four agencies in USDA's Research, Education and Economics mission area. ARS is charged with extending the nation's scientific knowledge and solving agricultural problems through its four national program areas: nutrition, food safety and quality; animal production and protection; natural resources and sustainable agricultural systems; and crop production and protection.

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How coffee berry borers survive on caffeine

The world's most devastating coffee pest can cut yields by up to 80 percent, and it survives on what would be a toxic dose of caffeine for any other insect. Some 850 insects can feed on different parts of a coffee plant, ...

dateDec 09, 2015 in Plants & Animals
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New disease resistant pea developed

Commercial pea growers stand to benefit from the release of Hampton, a new edible dry pea variety that resists some of the legume crop's most costly scourges, including pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) and bean leaf roll virus ...

dateSep 24, 2015 in Biotechnology
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A wash that reduces health risks in fresh produce

An Agricultural Research Service scientist in Pennsylvania has developed a sanitizing wash formulated with natural compounds that could reduce the number of foodborne illnesses caused each year by Escherichia coli, Salmonella, ...

dateSep 14, 2015 in Other
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A new forage comes to the Midwest, courtesy of nature

A forgotten forage grass imported from Europe in the 1800s could soon be helping to boost cattle and dairy production. The grass, which has adapted well to parts of the Upper Midwest, has been released by Agricultural Research ...

dateAug 28, 2015 in Ecology
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Taking the temperature of water-thirsty plants

When crops get thirsty, they get hot. Scientists can use canopy temperatures to determine if crops are water stressed. An Agricultural Research Service engineer in Colorado has found a way to simplify this process for farmers. ...

dateAug 28, 2015 in Ecology
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