A better way to pasteurize eggs

An Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientist in Pennsylvania and his colleagues have developed a technology that rapidly pasteurizes eggs and could sharply reduce the number of illnesses caused each year by egg-borne ...

Making the bed just right for alkali bees

Last summer, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) entomologist Jim Cane spent a week visiting alfalfa fields near the town of Touchet, in Walla Walla County, Washington. He wasn't scouting for insect threats or damage to the ...

Making products more biodegradable with starch

A new starch-based film, or coating, developed by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists, can make paper and other materials more water resistant and biodegradable. The film can potentially be used in food packaging, ...

Extracting heavy metals with vegetable oils

Dangerous lead levels in drinking water in cities across the nation have recently made national headlines. Water contaminated with lead, mercury, or other heavy metals poses serious problems for not only our health but also ...

Flushing Huanglongbing out of citrus trees

A U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologist is providing citrus growers with much-needed guidance about the best times to use insecticides to control Huanglongbing (HLB), or citrus greening.

New faba beans offer multiple benefits

Four winter-hardy faba bean germplasm lines developed by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their collaborators are now available for further development.

A database just for bumble bees

Look up the word "bumble," and the definition may read something like "To move or act in a confused, awkward or clumsy manner." But the bumble bee, a member of the genus Bombus, is anything but clumsy. In fact, the insects ...

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