Image: HiRISE spots Curiosity rover at Mars' Woodland Bay

Image: HiRISE spots Curiosity rover at Mars' Woodland Bay
NASA's Curiosity Mars rover can be seen in this image taken from space on May 31, 2019, by the HiRISE camera aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. In the image, Curiosity appears as a bluish speck. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

A dramatic Martian landscape can be seen in a new image taken from space, showing NASA's Curiosity rover examining a location called "Woodland Bay." It's just one of many stops the rover has made in an area referred to as the "clay-bearing unit" on the side of Mount Sharp, a 3-mile-tall (5-kilometer-tall) mountain inside of Gale Crater.

The image was taken on May 31, 2019, by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). In the image, Curiosity appears as a bluish speck. Vera Rubin Ridge cuts across the scene north of the , while a dark patch of sand lies to the northeast.

Look carefully at the inset image, and you can make out what it is likely Curiosity's "head," technically known as the remote sensing mast. A bright spot appears in the upper-left corner of the rover. At the time this image was acquired, the rover was facing 65 degrees counterclockwise from north, which would put the mast in about the right location to produce this bright spot.

Mirror-like reflections off smooth surfaces show up as especially bright spots in HiRISE images. For the camera to see these reflections on the rover, the Sun and MRO need to be in just the right locations. This enhanced-color image of Curiosity shows three or four distinct bright spots that are likely such reflections.


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Image: NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter views rover climbing Mount Sharp

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Citation: Image: HiRISE spots Curiosity rover at Mars' Woodland Bay (2019, July 15) retrieved 19 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-07-image-hirise-curiosity-rover-mars.html
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Jul 15, 2019
Look at how many salt deposits on Mars. They do not light up up the night from a million miles out like the same salts on Ceres. Those Martian salts should glow like that too. Our government's BEST scientists SAY puhlicly that it was SALT on Ceres. Who am I to doubt cuz' such as thay are paid a real lot of money to say truth like that and they are all honorable men, right?! I tried the same thing with salt. One of my car headlights went out, so I poured some salt on a gluetrap for rats and taped it over the busted light and off I went. Some dum cop wid' no eddicayshun did not believe those learned scientists, refused to see my salt glow, and clapped me with a TICKET for havin' dat headlite OUT!?
How dare him? But then I paid my fine....dum judge did not believe me either, dammit! I put that busted light with the trap and salt on it in the yard. At nite it did not glow. Judge was right. Cop was right. BUT THAT WOULD MEAN THAT SCIENTIST FOR THE GOVERNMENT LIED !?!?

Jul 15, 2019
How dare him? But then I paid my fine....dum judge did not believe me either, dammit! I put that busted light with the trap and salt on it in the yard. At nite it did not glow. Judge was right. Cop was right. BUT THAT WOULD MEAN THAT SCIENTIST FOR THE GOVERNMENT LIED !?!?


Nope, it would just mean that you don't understand what you are looking at. The images you see of Ceres are optically stretched, as the surface is very dark. It has an albedo of ~ 0.09. That is, it reflects about only 9% of the incident sunlight. The salts themselves have an albedo of ~ 0.4. Sea ice on Earth has an albedo of ~ 0.5 - 0.7.

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