Modelling galactic settlement

Modelling galactic settlement
Credit: ESA ACT

What looks like a still of an exploding firework is actually taken from an ESA simulation of humankind's expansion across the stars, produced for an international competition. Each dot is a habitable star system, with the colored stripes representing interstellar expeditions between them.

ESA's Advanced Concepts Team think tank came third in the latest Global Trajectory Optimization Competition—known as the "America's Cup of Rocket Science." Instead of navigating the high seas, it challenges the world's best aerospace engineers and mathematicians to direct spacecraft through space as part of an incredibly complex problem.

This year's challenge, set by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory as the previous winners, looked forward to a distant future when humankind has the capability and will to settle our entire Milky Way galaxy. Teams were challenged to settle as many of the one hundred thousand suitable for settlement in as uniform a distribution as possible, using as little propulsive velocity change as possible.

The was made up of representatives from a quartet of Chinese research organizations: College of Aerospace Science and Engineering; National University of Defense Technology, Changsha; State Key Laboratory of Astronautic Dynamics and Xi'an Satellite Control Center, Xi'an.


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Jun 26, 2019
"Teams were challenged to settle as many of the one hundred thousand star systems suitable for settlement in as uniform a distribution as possible, using as little propulsive velocity change as possible."

That would look a lot like Oumuamua, a rotating three-body tidal engine using lots of 60 degree gravity assists relative to the stellar velocities.

See:

Gravity Assist Engine for Space Propulsion

http://adsabs.har...99...99B


Jun 26, 2019
jax you might recheck the link .
i tried it & went no where fast!

Oumuamua was a large shard revenant of av asteroidal core.
similar to what you'd get smashing up Ceres.

?what is a "rotating three-body tidal engine"
?what is " 60 degree gravity assists"
?what is" relative to the stellar velocities."

https://en.wikipe...ss_drive

a propellantless drive that is a closed system, presumably in contradiction with the law of conservation of momentum. Reactionless drives are often considered similar to a perpetual motion machine.[1] The name comes from Newton's third law, often expressed as, "for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction."
&
"received much publicity from their promoters and the popular press in their day and both were eventually rejected when proven to not produce any reactionless drive forces. The rise and fall of these devices now serves as a cautionary tale for those making and reviewing similar claims.[2]"

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