Trees, the ancient Macedonians, and the world's first environmental disaster

ancient tree
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

It's a simple enough equation: good soil is the key to good food. And good soil starts with trees.

Alexander the Great conquered a vast empire that extended from Greece all the way to India. However, his ancestors' fortune was a mixed bag. A new series of studies show the ancient Macedonians may have been struck by one of the earliest environmental disasters linked to human activity.

Ancient sediment records sealed in lakes for thousands of years reveals how logging may have affected , which ultimately destroyed the capacity of the ancient Macedonians to grow food.

More , on the other hand, appears to have made less susceptible to climate change. The lessons for modern people—and our future prosperity—are clear.

Soil is a kingmaker

Something wonderful happens when rocks, formed in the guts of the Earth, come into contact with air and water: they break down into clays (and other things) to form soils. Because of their ability to store water and nutrients, soils are the food basket of land plants and all the animals that feed on them, including us.

Preserving has been the key for success to all past civilisations. Those who lost it would rapidly be precipitated into oblivion. This happened everywhere: the Middle East, Greece, Rome and Mesamerica.

Preserving our soil should therefore be at the centre of our concerns (although it rarely gets a look-in on the nightly news).

soil
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Erosion isn't just a problem because the land loses soil. This soil enters waterways, increasing the sediment load of rivers. This high sediment load harms freshwater and coastal ecosystems, including fish population and, ultimately, us. We therefore need to better understand how climate change and humans shape soil erosion.

Macedonian timber and the first environmental disaster

The chemistry of sediments deposited on lake's bottom records how the environment changed over hundreds and thousands of years. Recently, we have studied sediments from Lake Dojran, straddling the border between Northern Macedonia and Greece. We looked at the past 12,000 years of sediment archive and found about 3,500 years ago, a massive erosion event happened.

Pollen trapped in the lake's sediment suggests this is linked to deforestation and the introduction of agriculture in the region. Macedonian timber was highly praised for ship building at the time, which could explain the extent of deforestation.

A massive erosion event would have catastrophic consequences for agriculture and pasture. Interestingly, this event is followed by the onset of the so-called Greek "Dark Ages" (3,100 to 2,850 years ago) and the demise of the highly sophisticated Bronze Age Mycenaean civilisation.

Further to the west, at the crossroads between Albania and Norther Macedonia, Lake Ohrid holds a much longer storyline: an international scientific drilling program is uncovering the past million year of climate and environmental stories locked in Lake Ohrid sediments.

We recently looked at Lake Ohrid on a more modest time scale, similar to the Lake Dojran project: the past 16,000 years.

At Lake Ohrid, there are also signs of increased soil erosion around 4,000 years ago. These results are consistent with previous suggestions of a human role on soil erosion at other lakes in Greece.

trees
Credit: Notneb82, Wikimedia Commons

Overall, there are clear signs that deforestation and the development of agriculture precedes the Greek "Dark Ages." While the cannot be established with certainty, this timeline could represent the first negative feedback loop where humans depleted environmental resources, which in turn harmed communities.

Trees can make soil less sensitive to climate change

Lake Ohrid tells us another interesting story: until 8,000 years ago, soil erosion was closely following climate change. During dry and cold periods, erosion was shallow, probably as a consequence of dry conditions; while during warmer periods, higher levels of erosion delivered more sediment to the lake.

Around 8,000 years ago, something interesting happens: trees become the dominant type of vegetation cover. While trees were already abundant in previous warm periods (and less during cold periods), from 8,000 years ago onwards, they overwhelm the type of pollen that fell into the and became trapped in the .

This tree dominance has an important consequence for soil erosion: after 8,000 years ago, soil erosion became shallow and remained so, even while the climate continued to oscillate. We can see soil erosion became less sensitive to climatic fluctuations.

We already knew that trees, thanks to their deep roots, help stabilise soil and prevent its loss; what we learn here is that over a certain threshold of tree cover, they also make soil erosion much less sensitive to .

Lake Ohrid provides us with an important lesson, especially as we are increasingly concerned with how our soil and water resources will be affected by global warming. If we want to preserve our soils and rivers (and feed our communities) we need to ensure that enough of our landscape is covered with trees.

Planting trees and forest management should not be a concern for nature enthusiasts only, but for all us—regardless of political inclination—who enjoy eating. Understanding the past is not simply about learning from our ancestors' mistakes so we do not repeat them, but freeing ourselves from their grip so new paths unfold ahead of us.


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May 31, 2019
Not the first. The soil in the Euphrates valley became saltified and unusable from irrigation. Nebuchadnezzar had a grand plan to remove the top few feet throughout the valley but apparently gave up.

Agriculture began to ruin ecosystems soon after it was invented. A vast swath of land from the sahel to the gobi stripped, deforested, desertified, in the desperate attempt to feed exploding populations.

""There was a time when the countless tribes of men, though wide-dispersed, oppressed the surface of the deep-bosomed earth, and Zeus saw it and had pity and in his wise heart resolved to relieve the all-nurturing earth of men by causing the great struggle of the Ilian war, that the load of death might empty the world. And so the heroes were slain in Troy, and the plan of Zeus came to pass" (Cypria Fragments)."

-Even the gods understood overpopulation.

Jun 01, 2019
"It's a simple enough equation: good soil is the key to good food. And good soil starts with trees."

This is not a scientifically acceptable statement. Many factors are necessary for the creation of soil and not all of them are the same in every circumstance. In none of these processes are trees necessary-- after all trees need soil as a precondition to their own rooting process. Some of the finest agricultural soils in the world-- those found under the Great Plains of the central and southern North American continent-- have never had trees play any large role in their "creation". They originally eroded as sand and gravel from the uplift which formed the Rocky Mountains and were blown and washed toward what was becoming the Mississippi river. There microbiomes began to bioprocess them, and when grass appeared in the evolutionary saga and spread across the globe in the aftermath of the KT extinction events, they took over the soils of those high arid plains, never trees.

Jun 20, 2019
There are so many factors that can affect our delicate climate, we don't need Man Made warming on top of it, Man made emissions are devastating to our climate , the amount of emissions forced into our atmosphere by the fossil industry is comparable to extinction event amounts that happened in the past ! ! ! We need to stop this NOW !!!

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